SLOW PLAY DOES CAUSE BAD GOLF… (NEW DATA REVEALED!)



On this video, Neil Tappin talks gradual play! In some latest information revealed by Arccos golf, the extent to which tempo of play impacts the standard of your rating has come to mild. Neil talks by the info and exhibits how totally different handicap classes are affected by gradual play. You may discover out right here simply how a lot a gradual spherical of golf is more likely to have an effect on your rating.

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    47 Replies to “SLOW PLAY DOES CAUSE BAD GOLF… (NEW DATA REVEALED!)”

    1. Lol worried about 1.7 strokes

    2. Bincident says:

      6+ hour rounds at The Open today & they're on course to beat the all-time scoring record. (After round 2 of 4).

    3. Jean Forget says:

      no motor cart sharing. Play ready golf

    4. Mweisho Nene says:

      With all due respect, that difference is rather small. Secondly, if anything, I think you have it the wrong way around. Poor play, causes the time increase

    5. I have a local course that double books there tee times. 5. 5 and half hour rounds. Maddening

    6. Rod Phillips says:

      We've all played with that guy with the long set-up routine who, when he is having a rough day is torture to play with…From a different perspective, however, if I am feeling the pressure it usually happens while I am on the green. I am not a slow player by any means but can feel rushed when I am trying to assess my putt. Maybe that is just self-inflicted. Played last week and was able to do 18 in just under 3 hours and shot a great round. The pace kept me warm and my rhythm was consistent. I know that having to wait undermines that…

    7. Never heard of a 3-3.5 hour round unless I play by myself. I don't think making everyone play alone is a reasonable solution.

    8. Big C says:

      I don’t mind some slow players, but slow players that don’t let you play through are asking you to bomb a drive into them

    9. Orrrrrr., maybe if you're having a bad golf day it takes longer to play a round because you're hitting more shots?

    10. Jay Walk444 says:

      I'm not a fan of slow play, but with regards to this content i would say that correlation does not necessarily mean causation. What i mean is that when i play badly i take more shots, end up in the rough more and so my round takes a bit longer. So my bad play is causing my slower play, not the other way around. I'm not saying being held up is not unhelpful, just that i think these stats might be a case of 2 plus 2 equals 5

    11. Paul Whisker says:

      Most courses i play have no marshals to gee people up , that might help ?

    12. I could add that rangefinders have added a significant amount of time to the average round. Any thoughts on how to manage this?

    13. Simple course awareness: if you haven't reached your ball from the tee shot by the time the next group arrive and are ready on the tee, then wave them through, regardless of the size of the group following. A more radical solution for tournament golf is that if they are deemed responsible for slow paly and holding up other groups then they are penalised two shots for each member of that group. In terms of club play, then drill it into m,embers that playing for 5p per hole doesn't mean that you play out every ball to a finish, e.g. as soon as it is clear that the hole has been won or lost, move on! I've been a guest at a club and been frustrated by slow play having paid a guest fee. Perhaps having an automatic refund on green fees if your round has taken more than 4 1/2 hours might focus minds!

    14. Ken Brown says:

      not citing the cause of slow ply means they haven't eliminated the possibility of the causality relationship being in the opposite direction.

      there is also the possibility that the perception of being behind the pace can make people rush shots to try to catch up, with predictably bad results.

    15. Thomas Kemp says:

      The best way to seed up around is to play ready golf instead of playing in proper order. My dad and I can play around 18 holes in just over 2.5 hours in doing so yes we do have to walk some instead of riding to each ball.

    16. Steve Maz says:

      Does that include the difficulty of the course.. and the course length? Longer courses would take longer to play, with longer irons in play more often, also increasing the handicap. That’s a huge statement to make, with way too many factors that weren’t taken into account to claim. Like the thought, but in no way realistic.

    17. Pick the ball up after 5 strokes because 6 is the highest you can score unless in a real stroke play tourney and stop looking so long for balls

    18. Maybe do away with 4 balls they seem to always hold up the course why not play 2 pairs instead imo

    19. Matthew Cody says:

      Slow play is why good players quit, not worth the aggravation

    20. Never been over 3.5 hrs in the 10 years I’ve been playing and that’s 4 balls, anything longer is ridiculous.

    21. In Italy they do flight of 4 which is terrible. I would do max 3 players in competition

    22. Imo slow play is caused by two things: 1) lack of consideration for others. That could be by refusing to let faster groups play through, not clearing the previous hole fast enough, or treating every round of golf like you're playing in a professional tournament (e.g. removing the flag for every putt, taking multiple practice swings, assessing every angle of a putt, etc); and 2) courses cramming tee times in too much. Eight minutes between tee times simply isn't enough time, it should be at least 10 minutes.

    23. Collis Smith says:

      This doesn't show that. It could easily be high scores cause slow play!

    24. Play the right tees for your skill level and be ready to take your shot asap. I’m amazed at how many golfers I see just standing on the green watching others putt, to then start their own putting routines

    25. Dak Dak says:

      Length of round also depends on the quality of the half way house grub…

    26. Alan Watkins says:

      OMG..impacted by less than 1 to 2 strokes. Golf is for everyone of all ages and all handicaps plus physical ability. The impact is more than likely to be because of frustration…calm down, its all part of the game. Either shut up about "slow play" or advocate seperate times/days for different handicap groups.

    27. Ben Davies says:

      Surely you need to understand the data before you present it. Sorry to be hypercritical. I really like lots of the content on this channel, and I appreciate your work! But perhaps leave the statistics for those who understand it.

      How can your slow play data NOT TAKING INTO ACCOUNT WEATHER? This seems like an oversight that more or less invalidates the whole dataset. Weather is obviously correlated with slow play, and even more obviously correlated with higher scores. So your data says almost nothing interesting about the relationship between speed and score.

      However, even if you accept the assumption, the analysis is still silly… 'High handicappers are more impacted than low because their raw score increase is higher'? It would make more sense to look at this as a proportion of shots played (in which case there is almost certainly no statistically significant difference).

      If anything, lower handicappers are impacted more. 1.3 shots per round is over half the shots lost to par for that group (approximated an even distribution and an average handicap of 2.5). On the other hand 1.7 is just 10% of the shots lost to par over the same number of holes.

      This seems like a classical case of seeking data to justify a predetermined conclusion.

    28. Don't wait wait for the group in front to clear to play that 1 in a million shot. You really CAN'T hit the ball that far

    29. Steve says:

      Of course it does. Any time I have to wait an excessive time on a shot I invariably rush my shot/lose my rhythm.

    30. A good percentage of humans are selfish and inconsiderate. You see it in all facets of society,
      It's inevitable that this kind of behavior finds its way onto golf courses

    31. Come to Arizona in the summer and you can play, easily under 2 hours…if you don't spontaneously combust first!! LOL

    32. Yep, I’m a solo player for that reason

    33. I am one of those golfers that shoots higher when being held up by slower players. I think Courses should have clocks on every sign at the tee boxes indicating where you should be by this point in your round. They could go based on your start time and have each hole timed out from there.

    34. Are you playing slower because your playing worse and taking more shots or are you playing worse and taking more shots because you are playing slower? Chicken and egg argument. I don't like having to wait forever to tee off and I don't like being rushed. I find here that most people, at least here, are conscious of that and will let someone thru or the other way around so everyone can enjoy their round.

    35. laxbro7ify says:

      Ever stop to think that a player of that handicap, who is playing poorly, taking more strokes, etc.. , will necessarily take longer? Study is flawed.

    36. The best way to avoid slow play is to not rush your shots. Rushing shots leads to more mishits which leads to slower play.

    37. Marc Berland says:

      Some of the comments are just horrible…
      For all new golfers: don‘t worry if your round (walking) with friends takes 4 hours. It‘s pretty normal for a mixed flight (low or mid + high HCPs) to take 3h45min to 4h15min.

      I simply can‘t wrap my head around the fact, that people play golf, are going outside to beautiful places and are stressed out because they are there. Keep in mind:
      „Better be in the rough, than in the office „ 😄

      (>4.5 or even 5h+ is indeed drawn-out)

    38. It’s worse in winter. Standing around getting cold doesn’t help.

    39. Drew L says:

      I think it all depends on how many is in the group, only sure fire way to speed up the play is ban 4 balls, take it to 2/3 balls that will make it quicker. If I get out early morning by myself with no one in front I’m usually 2 1/2 hours. Big difference when I’m in a 4 ball and it’s just over 4 hours. However that will change the game we all love 🤔🤷

    40. Ken Phillips says:

      Who needed data to know this? It has been as plain as the nose on your face for the last 60 years to my knowledge. The only reason to doubt this data is how small the impact seems to be.

    41. Hate to say it because I hate playing slow, but this interpretation is not accurate. Playing worse, with more strokes, takes longer. You are showing correlation, not cause.

    42. Daniel Dias says:

      There is no causal relationship in the study, just some correlation. Arccos can’t do better.

    43. Kym Stock says:

      Maybe this explains why I score better on practice rounds compared to games! I always thought it could be stress or the score card unbalancing my stance. Maybe more clubs need to adopt the rule of placing a replacement ball near the edge of the fairway when a ball is lost with a two shot penalty. Surely this would speed up play? Then again, would it stop the player who slowly walks to his ball, takes a minute to assess his next shot, then has 6 practice swings, then stands over the shot for a minute before finally hitting the ball? High handicap players hit more shots and are more likely to hit into trouble ( we were all there at one time) . Perhaps having a limit on how many shots you can hit per hole ( 8?) then you pick up the ball and go to the next tee? Would this work?

    44. Who the F takes 4 hours, let alone 5?!

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